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"Conversion of Wild Edibles to Agriculture"

  Many "Wild" species are known to exist which are readily available at different times of year in the wild... many MORE than there are plants which are currently considered agricultural. In most cases these plants HAVE been used in past history to great success in agriculture in many parts of the world, and also in many cases they are considered just as safe and just as, if not more as in many instances, nutritious as there currently accepted agricultural counter parts.

    Often these plants have been reduced to the status of weed's or undesirable plant species... not due to nutritious deficiency... but usually due to nothing more than the fact that they have fallen out of popularity or have previously not been realized as edible in nature until recent times. Examples range from the lowly thistle and cat tail and pine, and range to the sweet flavored and ginormous edible wild potato plant which is considered a substitute for agricultural potato in many parts of the world... where often a single specimen can grow large enough to feed a village, or an entire family for a week or more from a single wild potato! The list of possibilities is extensive and as often there are many substitutes available for a single plant species (like the potato) research will be required to assess which would be best adapted based on size, adaptability to agriculture, taste, texture, and nutritional value.

"A Shoppers Guide to Non G.M.O. (or G.E. as it is also called) Foods You Can Buy!"

I could spend a year or more researching this topic, or I could send you straight to the current authority on the subject... which I think is a Better Alternative. For the complete Shoppers Guide in easy to download P.D.F. Form... check out the Link Below:

Source: Center for Food Safety

Center for Food Safety Shoppers Guide (P.D.F.)

Center for Food Safety Website


I Also Refer you to their Website for more Information on the current battle against the invasion of G.M.O. or "genetically engineered" food sources in our supermarkets. These people know their stuff and are very active in trying to protect consumers, and though I am NOT affiliated with them (Though I have signed up as a member to their site and encourage others to do so...) I fully support and Endorse their on-going efforts and view them as "Fellow Combatants"  who, though approach the situation differently than I do, are fighting the same Battle as I am, only from a separate front. Only when we as a people come together and do all we can to fight this ongoing Invasion into our Farms and food supply From ALL angles can we hope to secure a better future for the generations which are to follow us and who must receive this Planet from us and its food supply Once WE are gone.

"A listing of All Current U.S.D.A. Approved Vegetables in the United States of America."

Vegetables:

Artichoke
Asparagus
dry, edible Bean (snap or green Lima)
Table Beet
broccoli (including brocoli raab)
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage (including chinese)
Carrot
Cauliflower
Celeriac
Celery
Chive
Collards (including Kale)
Cucumber
Edamame
Eggplant
Endive
Garlic
Horseradish
Kohlrabi
Leek
Lettuce
Melon (all types)
Mushroom (cultivated)
Mustard and other Greens
Okra
Pea (Garden, English, or Edible Pod)
Onion
Opuntia
Parsley
Parsnip
Pepper
Potato
Pumpkin
Radish (all Types)
Rhubarb
Rutabaga
Salsify
Spinach
Squash (summer and winter)
Sweet Corn
Sweet Potato
Swiss Chard
Taro
Tomato (including Tomatillo)
Turnip
Watermelon

 These lists are not intended to be all inclusive, but rather to provide examples of the most common specialty crops. This web page will be updated as U.S. Department of Agriculture receives new questions about the eligibility of various crops.

Source: U.S.D.A. website:  http://www.ams.usda.gov/

"A listing of All Current U.S.D.A. Approved Medicinal Herbs in the United States of America."

Medicinal Herbs:

Artemisia
Arum
Astragalus
Boldo
Cananga
Comfrey
Coneflower
Fenugreek
Feverfew
Foxglove
Ginko Biloba
Ginseng
Goats Rue
Goldenseal
Gypsywort
Horehound
Horsetail
Lavender
Liquorice
Marshmallow
Mullein
Passion Flower
Patchouli
Pennyroyal
Pokeweed
St.John's Wort
Senna
Skullcap
Sonchus
Sorrel
Stevia
Tansy
Urtica
Witch Hazel
Wood Betony
Wormwood
Yarrow
Yerba Buena

These lists are not intended to be all inclusive, but rather to provide examples of the most common specialty crops. This web page will be updated as U.S. Department of Agriculture receives new questions about the eligibility of various crops.

 Source: U.S.D.A. website:  http://www.ams.usda.gov/

"A listing of All Current U.S.D.A. Approved Culinary Herbs and Spices in the United States of America."

Culinary Herbs and Spices:

Ajwain
Allspice
Angelica
Anise
Annatto
Artemisia (All types)
Asafetida
Basil (All Types)
Bay (Cultivated)
Bladder Wrack
Bolivian Coriander
Borage
Celendula
Chamomile
Candle Nut
Caper
Caraway
Cardamom
Cassia
Catnip
Chervil
Chicory
Cicely
Cilantro
Cinnamon
Clary
Cloves
Comfrey
Common Rue
Coriander
Cress
Cumin
Curry
Dill
Fennel
Fenugreek
File' (gumbo, cultivated)
Fingerroot
French Sorrel
Galangal
Ginger
Hops
Horehound
Hyssop
Lavender
Lemon Balm
Lemon Thyme
Lovage
Mace
Mahlab
Malabathrum
Marjoram
Mint (All types)
Nutmeg
oregano
Orris Root
Paprika
Parsley
Pepper
Rocket (Arugula)
Rosemary
Rue
Saffron
Sage (All types)
Savory (All types)
Tarragon
Thyme
Turmeric
Vanilla
Wasabi
Water Cress

These lists are not intended to be all inclusive, but rather to provide examples of the most common specialty crops. This web page will be updated as U.S. Department of Agriculture receives new questions about the eligibility of various crops.

 Source: U.S.D.A. website:  http://www.ams.usda.gov/

"A listing of All Current U.S.D.A. Approved Fruits and Tree Nuts in the United States of America."

Fruits and Tree Nuts:

Almond
Apple
Apricot
Avocado
Banana
Blackberry
Blueberry
Breadfruit
Cacao
Cashew
Citrus
Cherimoya
Cherry
Chestnut (for nuts)
Coconut
Coffee
Cranberry
Currant
Date
Feijou
Fig
Filbert (Hazelnut)
Gooseberry
Grape (including Raisin)
Guava
Kiwi
Litchi
Macadamia
Mango
Nectarine
Olive
Papaya
Passion fruit
Peach
Pear
Pecan
Persimmon
Pineapple
Pistachio
Plum (including Prune)
Pomegranate
Quince
Raspberry
Strawberry
Suriname Cherry
Walnut

These lists are not intended to be all inclusive, but rather to provide examples of the most common specialty crops. This web page will be updated as U.S. Department of Agriculture receives new questions about the eligibility of various crops.

Source: U.S.D.A. website:  http://www.ams.usda.gov/

"A Listing of All KNOWN G.M.O. Crops and foods"

Major G.M.O. cash Crops:

Maize
soybean
Cotton
Canola
Sugar Beet
Alfalfa
papaya
squash
Sugar Cane
Tobacco


G.M. Grains:

Barley
Hay
Oats
Proso Millet
Rice
Rye
Sorghum
Durum
Spring and Winter Wheat

G.M. Oil Seed Crops:

Canola
Flax seed
Peanuts
Mustard Seed
Rape Seed
Safflower
Soybeans
Sun Flower

Other G.M. Crops:

Beans
Peas
Lentils
Summer Potatoes
Sweet Potatoes

Other Genetically Modified Foods Commonly Found on Grocer's Shelves:

According to 2009 information from GMO Compass, approximately 80 percent of the food found on your grocer's shelves potentially contains genetically modified ingredients.

Honey (produced from bees harvesting G.M.O. Plants)
G.M. Rice

Soy Foods such as:
Soy Milk
Yogurt
Hummus
Flour
Tofu
and THOUSANDS of products containing soy ingredients.

Other Foods Include:

Fresh and Canned corn
Fresh and Canned Tomatoes
Canola Oil
Potatoes
Flax
Papaya
Squash
Meat
Dairy from animals fed G.M. Grains
Peas
(The List continues...)


Source: LIVESTRONG.COM http://www.livestrong.com/